Author: Brent Ylvisaker

Brent Ylvisaker

As an associate in Dorsey’s Finance & Restructuring Group, the types of areas in which he works include: banking regulations (e.g., affiliate transaction rules), consumer financial protection laws, Bank Secrecy Act and anti-money laundering regulations, financial data privacy and protection, state financial laws (including lending license requirements and usury laws) and e-commerce (e.g., E-SIGN and virtual currency).

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Supreme Court Issues Midland Funding Decision

On May 15, 2017, the Supreme Court issued a 5-3 decision holding that it is not a violation of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act to file a proof of claim in bankruptcy related to a debt for which the statute of limitations has expired, resolving a previous circuit court split regarding the issue.

Banks Appeal Fair Housing Act Case to Supreme Court

In September 2015, the Eleventh Circuit ruled that the City of Miami had sufficient standing to sue Bank of America and Wells Fargo over lending practices that were alleged to be racially discriminatory. On June 28, 2016, the U.S. Supreme Court granted certiorari in the case. The Supreme Court’s decision on this case could have a significant impact on who is entitled to bring fair lending claims against mortgage lenders and what standards of standing such claimants must meet.

Update on Proposed Amendments to the Borrower Defense to Repayment Rule

The U.S. Department of Education is continuing to move forward with issuing new regulations regarding the “Borrower Defense to Repayment Rule,” which concerns the ability of a Direct Loan borrower to seek a discharge of a Direct Loan repayment obligations if the educational services provided by a college were in some way deficient. These amendments are potentially important not only to borrowers, but also to colleges and the loan servicing industry.

The New “Yelp.com” for the Consumer Finance Industry

The CFPB recently added a new feature to its Consumer Complaint Database: namely, consumers now have the option to publish “narratives” detailing their allegations against a company. The problem lies in the possibility that these hearsay “narratives” will be used against companies in connection with enforcement actions or lawsuits.

The Burden-Shifting Framework in Disparate Impact Cases: The Inclusive Communities Decision and HUD’s Disparate Impact Regulation

In a recent decision, the U.S. Supreme Court held that disparate impact claims are cognizable under the Fair Housing Act, (“FHA”), 42 U.S.C. § 3601 et seq. See Texas Department of Housing & Community Affairs v. Inclusive Communities Project, Inc., 576 U.S. ___, 2015 WL 2473449 (Jun. 25, 2015). The specific issue on appeal in Inclusive Communities was whether Congress intended the FHA to open the door to disparate impact litigation, and the Court answered that question in the affirmative.

The U.S. Supreme Court’s Decision in Texas Department of Housing & Community Affairs v. Inclusive Communities Project, Inc.

The U.S. Supreme Court’s Decision in Texas Department of Housing & Community Affairs v. Inclusive Communities Project, Inc. SUMMARY. In Texas Department of Housing & Community Affairs v. Inclusive Communities Project, Inc., 576 U.S. ___, 2015 WL 2473449 (Jun. 25, 2015), the U.S. Supreme Court, in a 5-4 decision, held that disparate impact discrimination claims are cognizable under the Fair Housing Act, 82 Stat. 81, as amended,...