Author: Joe Lynyak

Joe Lynyak

Joe is a partner in the Firm’s Finance & Restructuring Group and a member of the Banking Industry Group. He practices in both the Firm’s Washington, D.C. and Southern California offices.Joe possesses a broad knowledge base regarding foreign banks and domestic banks, savings associations, bank holding companies, finance companies, mortgage banking companies and their subsidiaries and affiliates. His practice includes providing financial intermediaries advice in the areas of regulatory and strategic planning, application and licensing, legislative strategy, commercial and consumer lending, examination, supervision and enforcement, and general corporate matters.Joe’s FDIC-insured financial institution clients benefit from his experience in the special state and federal statutory and regulatory requirements—including safety and soundness issues—that apply to regulated financial intermediaries. He regularly counsels clients on matters such as retail operations, privacy, identity theft, consumer compliance, application and underwriting, payments systems, Internet, electronic commerce, examination, supervision and enforcement, operational and strategic planning matters.Joe is a frequent lecturer on legal topics involving the operation and regulation of financial service companies. Specific regulatory topics upon which Joe has advised clients and spoken at conferences include the Dodd-Frank Act, prudential regulation, the Volcker Rule, the Bank Secrecy Act (and other anti-money laundering provisions), mortgage lending and the CFPB.

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The Long Arm of the CFPB

On the fifth birthday of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”), Dorsey attorneys discuss the CFPB’s investigatory powers and explain – through an analysis of three important cases – how the events of early 2016 reveal a changing tide. Click here to read the article published in Corporate Counsel.

The U.S. Supreme Court’s Decision in Texas Department of Housing & Community Affairs v. Inclusive Communities Project, Inc.

The U.S. Supreme Court’s Decision in Texas Department of Housing & Community Affairs v. Inclusive Communities Project, Inc. SUMMARY. In Texas Department of Housing & Community Affairs v. Inclusive Communities Project, Inc., 576 U.S. ___, 2015 WL 2473449 (Jun. 25, 2015), the U.S. Supreme Court, in a 5-4 decision, held that disparate impact discrimination claims are cognizable under the Fair Housing Act, 82 Stat. 81, as amended,...